What can I do with a B.A. in Psychology?

If you’ve been yearning for a new career path or wanting to finish what you started years ago, you may find what you’re looking for through our Bachelors Completion program in Psychology.

Our unique program offers a rich and transformative learning experience through a flexible online format, which is suitable for working professionals, parents, and global students. This completion program allows you to complete your Bachelor’s degree online so you can finally start your career in the field of psychology.

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Loretta Farris, one of our BAC graduates said:

I had my doubts about receiving an education on-line, but I’m pleased to say that the experience was an overall success. I was fortunate to have a kind academic advisor who provided the guidance and encouragement I needed to help me complete my capstone project. Instructors with real-world expertise in their respective fields showed me how to go beyond my expectations of learning. Perhaps most importantly, my classmates shared their experiences with love, honesty and integrity and I will always be grateful to have been a part of their journey at Sofia University.

But what can one do after graduating with a B.A. in Psychology?

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BA Completion graduate, Devi Prem shares her success story:

I am most grateful to the quality and flexibility that the Sofia offers. For my BA completion I have received the most wonderful support to create my own body of work “Seven Sacred Rhythms of Leadership”, a dance meditation coaching offering. I will be continuing with the Global MA in Transpersonal Psychology program, which is truly a choice of my heart.

And BAC graduate Nisha Jumn shares:

I have nothing but great things to say about Sofia. This is an amazing program which offers students the stepping stones that propels us into worlds we may never have thought of entering. I am grateful for my professors and all they had to offer. The BAC program and the knowledge I gained from it resulted in me creating, Adi Shaktee, as an oasis for healing and a platform which I intend using for my women’s movement.

Below is a list of key elements that might help you increase the chances of landing the job of your dreams.

  • Plan early. Meet with your academic advisor to discuss your career interests and options and identify the unique constellation of knowledge, skills and characteristics you need to enter the career of your choice.
  • Assess yourself. Figure out who you are and what you want from a job. Consider these questions: ‘What are the 10 traits that describe you best? What working conditions must you have? How much money do you need to make? What are your long-term goals? What skills do you have and which do you most enjoy using?’ Your answers will provide a foundation for your job search and enable you to pinpoint the opportunities best suited to you.
  • Capitalize on your connections. Think about the people you’ve met who could give you job leads—perhaps you completed an internship, participated in a service learning event or volunteered at a school. Be sure to stay in touch with your professors since local agencies may contact them looking for “good” graduates to fill a job. And don’t forget, even after you graduate, you will need references or letters of recommendation, so staying connected with faculty is a smart choice.
  • Look beyond Internet job postings. With such sites as careerbuilder.com and monster.com, Indeed.com, linkedin.com, and ideal.org, the Internet is a wonderful tool for finding jobs. Many corporations may not list their jobs there, so be sure to visit company websites that may interest you and send an email to introduce yourself.
  • Take advantage of campus services, even after you graduate. Your campus career center and alumni office are both interested in your long-term success.

Kendra Cherry wrote an article on Verywell.com (About, Inc. company) entitled “Careers Options With a Bachelor’s Degree in Psychology”.

In this article Kendra mentions that as an undergraduate, chances are you have done a considerable amount of research and writing, and these skills would be useful in positions as a library assistant, probation officer, business manager, case worker and many other related areas. She also points out that the biggest advantage of a bachelor’s degree in psychology is its adaptability.

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So what are the most commonly held careers for those with a bachelors degree in psychology? According to The College Majors Handbook, some of the top occupations that employ those with a bachelor’s psychology degree are:

  1. Top- and mid-level management and administration
  2. Sales
  3. Social work
  4. Other management occupations
  5. Labor-relations, personnel and training
  6. Administrative positions
  7. Real estate, business services and insurance
  8. Marketing

As you enter the job market, consider jobs that require the skills you obtained during your psychology education. These abilities include:

  • Critical thinking
  • One-on-one and small group communication
  • Effective written communication skills
  • Understanding of individual human behavior
  • Knowledge of group and organizational behavior
  • Creative thinking skills

Some students even decide to continue their education due to specific careers that require further training. Therefore, many graduates of B.A. in Psychology programs eventually go on for their Masters in Counseling Psychology to become licensed therapists, the Masters in Tranpersonal Psychology to become educators and authors, or choose our doctorate level programs to become licensed psychologists and/or researchers.

Whichever path you choose, you are sure to set a solid foundation for your career success with our Bachelors Completion program.

For more information about our B.A. in Psychology program, please contact our Admissions team at admission@sofia.edu or 1-888-98-SOFIA.

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Faculty Spotlight: David Bergner

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Meet David Bergner, Interim Chair of the MBA program.

David is an energetic organizational leader, accomplished technologist, and passionate teacher with a strong commitment to his students. David earned both his Ph.D. in Management Science and M.S. in Engineering Economic Systems from Stanford University.

He retired from NASA with 30 years of diverse experience in science, engineering, technology research and development, program formulation and management, executive management, and organizational development. He teaches courses in Quantitative Methods, Operations Management, and Applied Decision Sciences. David’s research interests include frame analysis, computational dialogue models, organizational and team factors in data mining, and the emergence of online decision support communities.

We interviewed David to learn more about him and his interest in working at Sofia University.

How did you hear about Sofia University?

I learned about Sofia University in the spring of 2014, when I met Dr. Liz Li, the President. Liz expressed great enthusiasm for opportunities to create new programs in Computer Science and Business Administration, built on Sofia’s established excellence in Transpersonal Psychology. Liz explained that Sofia University is an evolutionary outgrowth of the Institute for Transpersonal Psychology, and that the traditions of that institution would continue in the new programs. I was very excited to hear about such a worthwhile effort, and I offered to help any way I could. Liz asked me to serve on an advisory board for the new programs, and I enthusiastically accepted.

What made you decide to join Sofia University as faculty and interim chair?

I suppose I chose to come to Sofia because of the people – I’m impressed with Sofia’s leadership team, as well as the faculty, and also with the students I’ve met so far. I have known of the ITP for many years, and have long held its founder, Bob Frager, in deep regard. Liz and her team have successfully implemented the vision she outlined two years ago, and now the new programs have become reality. I am grateful for continuing opportunities to support Sofia’s mission. At Sofia, I feel surrounded by positivity, enthusiasm, competence, commitment, worthy goals, and high ethical standards. When Liz offered me the opportunity to develop a new course on decision making in such a context, I said “Yes!” – no decision analysis required! I also welcomed the opportunity to help administer the new Business Administration program.

Any special interests or passions that you bring to the Sofia Community?

I’ve had deep interest in decision making for many years. This was the main focus of my graduate work. In graduate school, I studied Decision Analysis (DA) in depth, and discovered the power of that discipline to create clarity for many people faced with difficult decisions. However, there is a major gap in the primary foundation of DA, which is Decision Theory. That theory is focused on how to make a choice, given that the hard work of framing the decision has been accomplished already.

Decision Sciences in general have paid insufficient attention to the essential inquiry processes that generate decision alternatives and elicit values, and to decision framing. Often these are the main difficulties in decision making, so this is where I focus my own work.

At Sofia, I look forward to taking an integral approach to teaching and research focused on how inquiry, communication, and reflection provide a foundation for high quality decision making. Given this foundation, the mathematics of Decision Analysis and Data Science may be applied effectively in an integrated decision making process. I’m also particularly interested in how people sometimes turn to the Internet when faced with difficult decisions – I’d like to develop tools and processes to help make this more effective for them.

Tell us a bit about you and your interests and family.

I like to spend my spare time cooking and appreciating the beauty of nature, particularly in the company of my wife and our four twenty-something children: two daughters, and two sons.

David teaches a course called Applied Decision Sciences. This course provides an opportunity to improve decision-making. Students learn how to apply tools and models to more deeply understand their decision-making processes and those of their fellow students. Emphasis is on the dialogue process for effective inquiry, balanced with contemplation and reflection, clarification of values, surface assumptions, and development of an appropriate frame.

With this foundation, mathematical modeling and data science can generate insights by focusing further inquiry on essential variables and facilitating collaborative deep reasoning. Additional insights from decision science will deepen awareness of decision traps, such as “frame blindness,” as well as cognitive, perceptual, and motivational biases.

The decision matrix is defined as: the conjunction of four human capacities – believing, caring, framing, and doing. Here, matrix means “an environment or material in which something develops; a surrounding medium or structure”; it is derived from the Latin word for womb. A decision is “born” from this womb through awareness of the conjunction of these four capacities.

The decision matrix is a model that provides a basic foundation for structured inquiry about specific decisions, and also about decision making in general. In this course, the matrix model will provide a foundation for acquiring, integrating, and applying the knowledge of decision theory and decision science to actual decisions. The decision matrix is depicted at the center of the figure shown above. The Decision Wheel expands the matrix model to encompass additional concepts essential to applied decision science.

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The figure provides a graphical outline for topics covered in the Applied Decision Science course at Sofia. The Decision Wheel will be used to facilitate dialogue about decisions, and to organize and integrate topics covered in the course. Simple decisions as examples to reveal essential aspects of decision-making – however, the primary concern will be with challenging decisions, those having aspects such as uncertainty, complexity, dynamics, new situations, high stakes, long time horizons, or lack of established precedents, for example.

We assume decision makers in such situations will need to rely on others for information, expertise, and perhaps facilitation or analysis. In these cases, communication and inquiry are essential to decision quality, as is deep reflection to elicit and clarify values and to become aware of unconscious and implicit aspects of decision frames. From this perspective, the quality of a decision hinges on the quality, balance, and depth of the inquiry process that shapes it.

To learn more about our MBA program, please contact our Admissions team at admissions@sofia.edu or 1-98-SOFIA.

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August 16, 2016 · 9:01 pm

What can I do with Sofia’s Double Major: Masters in Computer Science and Masters in Transpersonal Psychology?

At Sofia University, we offer both a Masters in Computer Science as well as a Double Major M.S. in Computer Science and M.A. in Transpersonal Psychology. At first glance, you might not think psychology is even remotely related to computer science, but psychology is an essential component in creating technology as people are who create the computer applications and people are also who use the applications. In order for computers to be useful, programs and applications need to be intuitive, easy to use, and aimed at resolving problems or supporting our lives.DSC07067

Have you ever been frustrated trying to figure out how to use an app on your cell phone or, conversely, loved an app because it didn’t take much time to figure out how to use it? This process is called human-computer interaction, and people who understand psychology are better at understanding how people think. This makes for bettmaxresdefaulter user experiences while using computers and technology, whether it’s a cell phone or iPad app, an Excel spreadsheet, or a complicated database.

According to psychology degree 411 there are many opportunities for a Computer Programmer with a psychology background. It might be surprising to learn that psychology graduates have opportunities in computer programming, but when the continual advances in user-friendly technology are considered, this career trahqdefaultck makes sense to a growing number of students with a psychology background.

Computer programmers develop and execute programs for an end user or group of end users, and also work to improve and broaden programs that have already been built. Programming professionals frequently help write step-by-step user guides to new programs and features. The critical thinking skills and understanding of user psychology that psychology majors can bring to this field are especially helpful.

Some of the possible outcomes of your degree:

  • Analyze users’ experiences to help make software appealing, usable, and useful
  • Help develop software for rehabilitation technology
  • Create new and better user interfaces
  • Create new styles of games for education and fun

If you find yourself drawn to the world of technology, but also desiring to learn more about human behavior and development, this double major could be the perfect blend of interests for your future career. Plus, we are located in the heart of Silicon Valley, connecting you to the plethora of opportunities in this area.

For more information about this program or to visit our campus and attend a class, please contact our admissions office at admissions@sofia.edu, or 1-888-98-SOFIA.

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What are the differences between a Ph.D. in Transpersonal Psychology and a Psy.D in Clinical Psychology?

According to Psychology Career center.org, psychology careers are a highly regulated industry. Earning a degree, especially a doctorate, is very important to ones upward mobility and success. In fact, most research and teaching positions at major universities or government organizations require a doctorate degree.bb_vocalfry_free

Before deciding on which degree is the best fit for you, it may be helpful to know the differences in career potentials for both degrees.

Our Ph.D. in Transpersonal Psychology program is a non-clinical, research-focused degree, whereas our Psy.D. in Clinical Psychology is a clinical, applied-psychology program that is designed to lead graduates towards licensure as a clinical psychologist.

Below you’ll find additional information on common careers and employment areas pursued by individuals who obtain a doctorate degree in psychology and those who obtain a doctorate degree in clinical psychology.

Careers in Transpersonal Psychology

Some of the most common areas where graduates with a doctorate degree in Transpersonal Psychology may work include: government, business, research, and education. They may also become authors, coaches, speakers, and facilitators of workshops and public programs.

Alumna Julie Gohman, graduated from the Ph.D. in Transpersonal Psychology program at Sofia University and became a professorjulie.cropped-276x300 of psychology and author of 10 Sacred Questions for Every Woman.

Julie writes about women’s development, motherhood, spirituality, and the art of self-inquiry. Most of what Julie does, in both her personal and professional life, is dedicated to human growth and development, teaching and learning, and understanding the complex dimensions of human behavior. It’s her goal to be mindful and present, to be loving and kind, and to live with wisdom and grace. Julie also believes in the power of gratitude as a game-changer for everything in her life.

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Alumna Bertita Graebner also graduated from the Ph.D in Transpersonal Psychology program at Sofia. Bertita takes an approach that draws from the whole person and integrates principles from Transpersonal Psychology, Positive Psychology, Mindfulness, Solution-based Therapy, Somatics, and Cognitive Behavioral Psychology. Bertita has faith in the coaching process to transform individuals and to create enduring change. She believes in the power of meaning-making to enable transformation and shift towards what is next. She also supports women between the ages of 45 and 85 in transition.

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Dr. Rosie Kuhn, is another graduate from the Ph.D. in Transpersonal Psychology program at Sofia. She is the author of the popular ‘Self-Empowerment 101’ and founder of The Paradigm Shifts Coaching Group in Silicon Valley, is the preeminent Thought Leader in the field of transformational coaching, coach training and leadership development. Rosie specializes in identifying and transforming belief systems that hold people back in business and in life. She empowers individuals, executives and organizations to fearlessly embrace transformation and realize previously untapped potential.

Careers in Clinical Psychology

According to My Graduate School.com, graduates of applied or clinical psychology programs often become mental healthcare practitioners who diagnose and treat mental and emotional disorders through the use of therapy. However, they may also work within the field of academia for research purposes as well.

“This is a very broad category that includes any occupation in which the psychologist interacts with clients for the purpose of assessment, diagnosis, treatment, or prevention of mental health issues (in most careers as a clinical psychologist), or to help clients deal with challenges of daily living (in most careers as a counseling psychologist).”

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Many graduates of clinical psychology programs go on to work in private practice, hospital settings and clinics, or with businesses as a practitioner, administrator, or both. Some specialize in Forensic psychology and work closely with courts and juries. While others may go onto work in government agencies, correctional facilities, or as school psychologists.

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Alumna, Dr. Sarah Neustadter is a Clinical & Transpersonal Psychologist, with her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from Sofia University.

Her clinical experience as a psychologist includes working with the severely mentally ill population with bipolar and schizophrenia, crisis-management, suicide prevention, and additionally, in the Los Angeles public school system with at-risk teenagers dealing with all kinds of modern-day adolescent issues.

“My work integrates my “no-nonsense” New York ethic and sense of responsibility with a humanistic approach to psychology, incorporating psychodynamic depth-work, cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), mindfulness, alternative modalities of healing such as meditation, mindfulness, shamanism, and other mind-body practices”

 

MeghanFraleyAlumna Meghan Fraley also graduated with a Doctor of Philosophy (Psy.D.) in Clinical Psychology from Sofia University. She is now a licensed psychologist in California and works at the Sofia Counseling Center. She is also actively engaged in grassroots organizing work addressing economic and social justice issues with the Raise the Wage South Bay & Peninsula Coalition, Politically Inspired Action, and the ACLU of Northern California

“Overall, my passion is to help people feel more connected to themselves and the people and world around them. My approach to therapy is warm, compassionate, and empowering. I support individuals in overcoming the obstacles that prevent them from living freely, authentically, and joyfully. My clinical specialties include: depression, anxiety, life transitions, spiritual/existential concerns, and women’s issues”.

 

markformanAlumnus Mark Forman, Ph.D. is also a graduate of the Psy.D. program at Sofia and is now a licensed clinical psychologist with fifteen years experience working with individuals, couples, teens, and families. Mark has found success as the Clinical Director of Life Design Centre and Lead Trainer of the Certified Integral Psychotherapist (CIT) Training Program. He currently teaches courses in Integral Theory at Sofia.

 

No matter what path you decide on, both degrees provide the opportunity to work in administrative roles within universities, public or government institutions, or in businesses.

For more information about careers and salaries for individuals with degrees in psychology, read The 25 Most Lucrative Careers in Psychology.

To learn more about our doctoral programs, please contact our admissions team at admissions@sofia.edu.

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Celebrating the Graduating Class of 2016

Congratulations to the graduates of Sofia University, Class of 2016!

“to live in this world
you must be able
to do three things
to love what is mortal;
to hold it

against your bones knowing
your own life depends on it;
and, when the time comes to let it go,
to let it go”

– Mary Oliver

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This year marked a very special commencement ceremony with world renowned author, physician, and luminary, Dr. Deepak Chopra delivering the commencement speech to over 250 attendees!
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After sharing a personal story from his childhood, Chopra then connected it to his philosophy on awareness and love.

“Love is not just a mere sentiment. It’s not just a mere emotion, although that’s wonderful. But love is the ultimate truth at the heart of the universe. That kind of love will transform you and transform the rest of the world, or whoever you come into contact with – not because of what you say, not because of what you do, but because of your presence.”

He was also awarded an honorary doctorate degree conferred by university founder, Dr. Robert Frager and university president, Dr. Liz Li.
We wish you all the success and happiness you deserve as you step onto the next stage of your journey. We will miss you!

 

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When a New Life is Calling You – How Will You Respond?

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How I Came to Sofia University

Kimberly Anne ChristensenKimberly Anne Christensen, 4th year – PhD in Transpersonal Psychology

Many students come to this school because it is a CALLING! We have been directed through signs or spiritual messengers to come here. This is not a NORMAL school.(Smiles). Clearly, there is something very special about this school which attracts people that believe or recognize in another level of consciousness. Coming to this school is a sure sign that you are seeking a non-traditional approach that recognizes something within you that is crying out for expression and can transform not just yourself, but send ripples of transformation outward to all who come in contact with you.

IT WASN’T JUST A DREAM…...

1864411974_fa6b7b02f9_zI woke up one morning in April 2012 after a dream in which I saw myself in San Francisco and I didn’t know why. I was hundreds of miles away in Yreka, CA, wondering what I would be doing in this 3rd phase of life. I had no job or source of income, but knew I was supposed to get my doctorate. Two weeks later, in a guided meditation on my life purpose, I imagined myself standing on a beach and saw on a huge banner laying on the sand displaying the words TRANSPERSONAL PSYCHOLOGY. I was shocked. I never seen words in my meditations and had no knowledge of this field of psychology.

When I looked it up on Google with a keyword search of San Francisco, I found a school that seemed to fit the bill – the Institute of Transpersonal Psychology actually existed and offered doctorate degrees! FYI. Once I made this connection, I was consistently sent messages and photos and signs that I was to move my life to San Francisco Bay Area. The synchronicity was evident!

RESPONDING TO THE CALL

hqdefaultOriginally from Southern California, this was a big move for me. I had never lived in the Bay Area before and I didn’t know anyone. But I kept moving forward. I applied to the school and made an appointment to visit and learn whether I had what it took to be part of the doctoral program.

That appointment in July changed everything and convinced me this was the right place for me. There were 3-4 Admissions counselors who all greeted me by name and they were some of the most caring people I had ever met. They were eager to show me the campus and point out the growth that was coming.

The school had recently been renamed Sofia University, and they completely believed in the future of the school.

Then I met with the kindest woman named Genie Palmer for my interview. She embodied my understanding of transpersonal and also made me feel SAFE. She told me how my dreams would fit in with the school and the program of my choice and clarified all the details.

When my interview was over, the admissions staff offered to drive me back to my hotel so I wouldn’t have to endure another 1 hour or more trip on the bus! My security needs were met, and the financial aid office assured me everything would be okay.

I never got housing squared away until I got here, and my financial aid check was not ready since I applied late, but to my surprise, some very generous and kind students took me in for free!

This is the nature of the school — THE HUMAN TOUCH. Kindness. Mercy. Generosity. These are qualities that ripple throughout the staff and faculty of this school.

THE RESULT

6660064659_5bd12b756a_bFast forward four years and it’s 2016. I have passed my proposal and am ready to conduct my research on the use of guided imagery in science to raise academic test scores for 3rd grade students (I was a former educator). I now also work at the school, beginning in the Dissertation office with Dr. Carol Haefner, and now with the Marketing and Communications department to help promote and share our special and unique gifts with others across the world.

I love Sofia University.  I am happy I heeded the call. I know getting my doctorate here is helping me fulfill my dream of opening up a charter school that provides the same kind of caring, compassion and transpersonal practices that Sofia/ITP has shared for 40 years.

Learn more about the residential Transpersonal Psychology doctorate program

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Transformative Tech Lab at Sofia University Bridges Psychology and Engineering to Create Conscious and Impactful Technology

The Transformative Technology Lab (TTL) and Sofia University are creating an impact factory for the development and commercialization of scalable technologies to increase human well-being.

According to co-founders Dr. Jeffery A. Martin and Nichol Bradford, the lab incorporates an open-community approach toward research and development services, training, and go-to-market evaluations in the Transformative Technology space. Academically, the lab conducts and publishes research in the area of Transformative Technology, advises Sofia University on the curriculum for their Transformative Technology degree programs, and mentors and supervises graduate students.

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For the wider Transformative Technology community, the lab hosts open ‘maker’ type events, Meetups, workshops, industry conferences, as well as other public and private events.

“The future of education is no longer isolated,” says Sofia University President Liz Li, Ph.D. Sofia University and the Transformative Technology Lab take the core disciplines of psychology, computer science, and business and combine them in a practical cross-discipline, team-based structure, with real world applications.”

“Our programs are graduating students with Masters Degrees in Computer Science and minors in Psychology, and Masters and PhD Degrees in Psychology with a focus on Computer Science,” says Dr. Li. “Students are able to blend technology, science, business and the school’s 40 years of leadership in humanistic and transpersonal psychology to create substantial real-world impact. Our ‘whole-person’ approach to education allows them to better understand the people around them and, in-turn, become leaders of more productive organizations.”

The lab has also attracted advisors and mentors who work at its major Silicon Valley neighbors such as: Google, Founders Fund, Twitter, Mayfield Fund, Palo Alto Neuroscience, Spire and Heartmath.

Its academic advisors and collaborators span the world and all areas related to Transformative Technology, and include researchers from: Harvard, Yale, Stanford, UCLA, UCSF, UC Irvine, UC San Diego, UC Berkeley, Rochester Institute of Technology, Northwestern University, University of Washington, University of Arizona, NYU, King’s University College (Canada), Institute of Psychiatry/Kings College London (U.K.), Duke-NUS (Singapore), and Hong Kong Polytechnic University (China).

More Impactful Engineers and CEOs

Sofia’s Masters Degree programs in Computer Science and Business Administration, in conjunction with its well-regarded Psychology programs, are teaching students, especially engineers, to be more mindful, effective and impactful.

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Graduates enter the workforce with both a cutting-edge education and as well-rounded leaders. Unlike other MS and MBA programs, especially those online, students don’t just pass one course at a time in isolation, because lab’s research and integration into Sofia’s curriculum helps them combine disciplines in a way that is unimaginable at other top universities.

Mentorship-based Incubator

TTL and Willow Group co-founder Nichol Bradford expects the program will also enhance the university’s growing reputation as an incubator for entrepreneurs. “Transformative Technology is the next big thing and there is a quickly growing pool of entrepreneurs in the Valley who are looking to build companies that tackle the opportunities it creates. The TTL-Sofia partnership will support this trend,” says Bradford.

Sofia University is more than just academically invested in the idea. An incubator started by the school, Incubator C-Space, has already become well known in Silicon Valley. Dr. Li says the university has also established a practice of investing in start-ups from students. She says the university is more likely than ever to continue that practice with the launch of the TTL.

“TTL’s research will help students evolve from a resume-driven post-graduate experience to an entrepreneurial one where one of the top reasons for failure – team failure – is academically economized,” says Dr. Li. “That could launch an exciting new era in higher education.”

In October 2016, TTL will host the Transformative Technology Conference from October 6-9th at Sofia University, 1069 E. Meadow Circle in Palo Alto, CA. This the only conference focused on learning, sharing, and connecting in order to drive serious research and development, commercialization, and awareness of Transformative Technology.

To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit: http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/from-isolation-to-tech-impact-factory–a-combo-psych-and-tech-lab-helps-sofia-university-educate-more-impactful-engineers-taking-psychology-and-engineering-from-adversaries-to-allies-300149192.html

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What can I do with my Masters in Counseling Psychology?

According to MastersinPsychologyguide.com those who graduate with a Masters in Counseling Psychology may find employment in an array of different settings, from working in their own private practice to assessing mental disorders out in social care settings. They may specialize in subcategories such as health psychology, transpersonal psychology, or learning disabilities, which could also influence their chances of finding employment in a certain specialty area.

Many of our counseling psychology program students focus their interest in the following areas of this unique helping profession:

Private Practice Counselor or Therapist (LPCC/LMFT)

The primary role of a counselor or therapist is woman-and-man-on-couch-near-therapistto assess, diagnose, and treat client mental and emotional disorders. Most counselors and therapists desire to work in a private practice so they can set their own hours while working with as many or as few patients as they prefer.

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Alumna Manuela Mischke Reeds, M.A., MFT is a great example of a Sofia University graduate who accomplished her dream of becoming a private practice therapist. As a psychotherapist for 25 year, her approach toward therapy invites clients on a journey of both self-discovery and education. Manuela supports her clients’ process of healing and focuses on equipping her clients with specific resources to help alleviate and resolve their presenting issues.

Alumna Crystal Stokes  is another graduate of the Master of Arts in Counseling Psychology program who also works in private practice. Crystal combines eastern and western approaches towards psychotherapy, in conjunction with functional fitness, holistic nutrition, consciousness, and mindfulness.

Substance Abuse Counselor

Some counselors and therapists specialize in helping individuals and families who struggle with addiction. These therapists may work with groups or individuals as part of an outpatient program, or within a hospital setting. Sometimes additional certification is required to serve this population.

Rehabilitation Counselor

While some addiction therapists work in hospitals, others work in rehabilitation facilities. holly-daniels-outreach-sober-college

Alumna Holly Daniels, is another example of a Sofia graduate who has become a successful licensed marriage and family therapist. Holly works as a substance abuse and rehabilitation counselor and also serves as a meditation teacher, mental health advocate, and most recently as the Clinical Outreach Director at Sober College.

In her role as Clinical Outreach Director at Sober College, Holly is able to integrate her complex clinical expertise with her passions for connecting people and spreading the word that the path of recovery, health and wholeness can be both exciting and fulfilling.

Geriatric Counseling Therapist

With more and more people living well into their 80’s and 90’s, there is a growing need for counselors who can work with the elderly, especially those who suffer from mental illnesses as a result of the aging process.

 

Learning Disabilities Specialist

Some counselors work in elementary or high schools to provide support to students with learning disabilities. These counselors and therapists may also help diagnose disorders suchspeechkid as ADD and Autism, which can affect a student’s ability to learn.

Child Mental Health Specialist

Those who enjoy working with children may wish to specialize in child development and work as a child counselor or therapist. Becoming a child mental health specialist is a way to help children work through problems at school and at home, and to diagnose mental health issues early enough in life to make a difference.

Adult Mental Health Counselor

While some mental health counselors choose to work with children, others specialize in adult mental disorders. This generalized position is usually available in hospital settings or a private clinic.

Below are more job options for MFT’s or LPCC licensed professionals.

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Schools

MFT’s work at all levels of the school system – from treating families with troubled elementary school students to counseling parents on how to understand and cope with an out-of-control teenager.

Social Service Agencies

MFT’s are hired to work for government, non-profit, and for-profit agencies that provide social services to children, youth, families, seniors, and communities. Sometimes, marriage and family therapists are hired to take on administration roles, such as supervising other counselors and social service staff.

Medical Centers

From conducting psychosocial assessments to making resource referrals for patients in need of outpatient assistance, therapists also work at a medical centers and collaborate with other team members to ensure patients receive and maintain adequate treatment. They may provide both clinical and therapeutic services to patients on an individual basis and/or within a group setting.

In addition, there are other career opportunities for MFT’s that help counselors obtain success and professional growth such as:

Nursing and Residential Care Facilities. 

Marriage and family therapists are hired by nursing homes and residential care facilities to diagnose and treat mental and emotional issues related to married couples and families. Oftentimes, therapists provide counseling related to coping with a spouse’s or family member’s illness.

Legal and Correctional Systems

MFT’s also help families and couples in legal crisis, and with those who are working through issues in the correctional system. Sometimes therapists work are called upon to make recommendations to courts regarding the outcome of child custody cases or visitation disputes. To make a fair determination, the therapist often contacts doctors, schools, social starticle-0-1E07829300000578-884_964x598aff, juvenile counselors, and law enforcement personnel. It is also not uncommon to see therapists testify in court.

In regards to correctional system work, therapists may assume the role of counselor for families of spouses who are newly released from prison. Therapists may also hold therapy sessions for incarcerated individuals to address issues concerning their family ties or spouses before gaining reentry into society. Other cases may involve sexual abuse victims and perpetrators, as well as juvenile offenders, and mental health cases found in the criminal justice system.

Health Maintenance Organizations – HMO’s

Health maintenance organizations provide or make managed care arrangements for health insurance, self-funded health care benefit plans, and individual patients. They work with a range of health care prmaxresdefaultoviders (such as hospitals and doctors) on a prepaid basis, hiring MFT’s to treat clients.

For example, Kaiser Permanente, the largest not-for-profit health maintenance organization in the U.S, hires marriage and family therapists to work in their related behavioral health centers, chemical dependency treatment programs, and mental health facilities.

The Government

MFT’s employed by the government assume roles that can influence decision-making on a government and political level. According to the BLS, therapists working with the government on both the state and local level, are typically paid the highest salaries for this occupation in the U.S.

The Military

Marriage and family therapists are employed at clinical resource centers dedicated to assisting and supporting current service members, veterans, and their families. Often providing PTSD and TBI counseling to Active Duty, Reserve, and National Guard servicemen, therapists typically complete additional coursework or training, or experience assuming a role with the military, such as the Therapy with Military Families Specialization.090818-N-2541H-001

Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Facilities

It wasn’t too long ago that Marriage and Family Therapists were not eligible to be hired by the Department of Veterans Affairs to work in VA facilities, but the Department has since expanded access to such mental health services. Now therapists working in VA facilities conduct screenings and assessments; develop treatment plans and goals for patients; provide crisis intervention; and offer individual, conjoint, family and group therapy.

Industrial-Organizational Psychologist

Industrial-Organizational Psychologists are human efficiency experts who specialize in working with companies and corporations to keep employees efficient, healthy, and working hard. The majority of industrial-organizational psychologists enter their careers with a master’s in I/O psychology, but salaries increase substantially with doctoral education. The industry for this career is one of the most stable and expanding on this list. Companies around the world are dedicating time and money to making their employees more efficient and happier, and are hiring I/O psychologists right out of school to make this happen.

Churches and Religious Settings

According to American Association of Marriage and Family Therapists (AAMFT), 25% of specialty family therapists work in faith-based settings.

Sturbuck Community Church

Although they receive the same training as secular family therapists, MFT’s who complete additional coursework in religion and counseling can become a faith-based therapy provider, such as a Christian family therapist. This kind of therapist provides counsel to married couples and families regarding mental health problems, relationship issues, and parenting concerns – all while following a treatment and counseling approach that falls in line with the Christian faith.

In conclusion, this is not an exhaustive list of all the places that people with MFT or LPCC degrees can work, but aims to highlight some of the employment opportunities offering the highest number of available possibilities.

From working as case managers for insurance companies to negotiating psychiatric care for employees of large corporations, the number of job positions that marriage and family therapy professionals qualify for continues to increase with experience, further training, and education.

You can refer to CareersinPsychology.org for more insight into the job opportunities available to licensed Marriage and Family therapists.

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Research in a Sacred World

By Rosemarie Anderson, Ph.D.


While qualitative approaches have a long history in medicine and philosophy, the formal articulation of qualitative research methods begin with Phenomenological Research and Grounded Theory in the 1960s; Ethnography and Case Study methods in the 1970s; Narrative Research, HeurisStained_glass,_Holy_Family_Church,_Teconnaught,_September_2010_croptic Research, Art- and Body-based Approaches, and Transpersonal Approaches in the 1990s; and Auto-biographical Approaches, Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis, and Mixed Methods, among others, in the 2000s. Qualitative Methods rapidly secured strong traditions especially in the United Kingdom and the United States and increasingly elsewhere. All these methods are rooted in hermeneutic perspectives developed in Europe in the late 19th C. and 20th C.

The Transpersonal Approach developed by the late William Braud and myself in the mid-1990s and first published in 1998 are essentially “mixed-method approaches,” that endorse both quantitative and qualitative approaches for the study of transpersonal and spiritual topics. However, in addition, to the standards of detailed documentation and analysis, we advocated that transpersonal research incorporate the following principles to guide transpersonal research:

  • An interior interpretative and reflective perspective
  • Research topics evolve from explicit personal life experience
  • Multiple ways of knowing, including intuition and personal insights
  • Transformation of self and others through research
  • Research as a response to the Sacred world

 

Biography

Rosemarie Anderson is Professor Emerita at Sofia University in Palo Alto, CA. and a research consultant. She received her Ph.D. in experimental psychology from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln in 1973 and a M. Div. from the Graduate Theological Union in Berkeley, CA in 1983. In 1998, she authored Celtic Oracles (Random House) and co-authored, with William Braud, Transpersonal Research Methods for the Social Sciences (SAGE Pubs), the book that established the field of transpersonal research methods. In 2011, she co-authored Transforming Self and Others Through Research (SUNY Press) with William Braud and co-authored Five Ways of Doing Qualitative Research: Phenomenological Psychology, Grounded Theory, Discourse Analysis, Narrative Research, and Intuitive Inquiry (Guilford, 2011) with Frederick Wertz, Kathy Charmaz, Linda McMullen, Ruthellen Josselson, and Emalina McSpadden. As a research supervisor and consultant, she oversees research using Intuitive Inquiry, Narrative Research, Art- and Body-based Approaches, Case Study, and Mixed Methods (Quantitative and Qualitative). She lives in Oregon and is a student of Denma Locho Rinpoche and Paul Goodberg.


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A Writer and A Scholar: Remembering the Work of William Braud

william-b.jpgWilliam Braud, Ph.D. preferred to think of himself as a writer, educator, researcher, and scholar. He began his academic work in physics, at Loyola University in New Orleans, but switched to psychology, earning his B.A. in psychology in 1964 from the University of New Orleans.

He earned his M.A. in 1966 and his Ph.D. in 1967, both in experimental psychology,at the University of Iowa. From 1967 to 1975, he taught undergraduate and graduate psychology courses at the University of Houston and conducted original research in areas of learning, memory, motivation, psychophysiology, and the biochemistry of memory. After 8 years, he left his tenured Associate Professorship to join a private research organization, Mind Science Foundation (San Antonio, TX). In his 17 years there, he directed research in parapsychology; health and well-being influences of relaxation, imagery, positive emotions, and intention; and the then-new field of psychoneuroimmunology.

In 1992, he joined the Residential Core Faculty of the Institute of Transpersonal Psychology (Palo Alto, CA), serving as a professor, research director, dissertation director, and co-director of ITP’s William James Center for Consciousness Studies. In 2002, when ITP initiated its distant learning Global Ph.D. Program, he moved to its Global Core Faculty. In 2009, Dr. Braud retired from his position at ITP, and was awarded the title of Professor Emeritus.

During his 17 years at ITP, Professor Braud taught research-related graduate psychology courses, supervised dissertations, and conducted quantitative and qualitative research studies in areas of exceptional human experiences (mystical, intuitive, peak, transformative) and their interpretations, meanings, and life impacts; personal and spiritual change and transformation; alternative ways of knowing; the development and promotion of more inclusive and integrated inquiry approaches for transpersonal studies and science in general; and examining some of the underlying assumptions of science, psychology, transpersonal psychology, and certain spiritual and wisdom traditions.

He also served on Editorial Boards of several professional journals and is the recipient of fellowships, travel awards, federal grants, honors and awards, including a university-wide Teaching Excellence Award (University of Houston), Award for Outstanding Contribution (Parapsychological Association), and President’s Award for Outstanding Service (Institute of Transpersonal Psychology).

Before his death, Professor Braud published over 250 articles in professional psychology journals and numerous book chapters he coauthored, with Rosemarie Anderson, 

51Ql-hioArL._SX331_BO1,204,203,200_.jpgDistant Mental Influence

Professionals in modern psychology, behavioral medicine, and psychoneuroimmunology are exploring ways in which we can “mentally” influence our own bodies through hypnosis, imagery, visualization, attention, intention, and other forms of self-regulation–for fostering physical and psychological health and well-being.

  • Is it possible for us to use such techniques to influence others, even at a distance, for purposes of healing?
  • Is it possible for us to influence the images, thoughts, behaviors, and physiological reactions of other persons–separated by distance–without conventional sensory means of interaction?
  • Can these abilities extend to animals and even to cells (e.g., human red blood cells)?
  • Might these abilities be involved in the efficacy of distant, mental, or spiritual healing and intercessory prayer?
  • Might these influences even extend to events distant in time–even “backwards in time?”
  • Do these influences have major implications for our scientific theories, our human identity, the interconnections between ourselves and nature, and our relationships with others?Careful laboratory work–described in detail in this book–suggests that the answer to all these questions is a resounding “Yes!”A personal introduction and 12 detailed chapters describe the evidence that support these important claims. The book also describes the factors that make such distant mental influences more or less likely, so that anyone might use these distant influence skills more effectively and consistently for their own benefit and for the benefit of others.

 

51UTqckqLTL._SX331_BO1,204,203,200_.jpgTransforming self and others through research

Research approaches in the field of transpersonal psychology can be transformative for researchers, participants, and the audience of a project. This book offers these transformative approaches to those conducting research across the human sciences and the humanities. Rosemarie Anderson and William Braud first described such methods in Transpersonal Research Methods for the Social Sciences (1998). Since that time, in hundreds of empirical studies, these methods have been tested and integrated with qualitative, quantitative, and mixed-method research designs. Anderson and Braud, writing with a contribution from Jennifer Clements, invite scholars to bring multiple ways of knowing and personal resources to their scholarship. While emphasizing established research conventions for rigor, Anderson and Braud encourage researchers to plumb the depths of intuition, imagination, play, mindfulness, compassion, creativity, and embodied writing as research skills. Experiential exercises to help readers develop these skills are provided.

41rxTbaOAXL._SX331_BO1,204,203,200_.jpgTranspersonal research methods for the social sciences

There is no shortage of research methods that are easily applied to the study of everyday human experience. How, though, does one attempt to study extraordinary human experiences – ultimate values and meanings, peak experiences, transcendence and heightened awareness, among others.

William Braud and Rosemarie Anderson introduce a series of transpersonal research methods that are intended to help researchers develop new ways of knowing and methods of inquiry. While these methods will be of particular interest to researchers in transpersonal psychology, humanistic psychology, or transpersonal studies applied to traditional fields, the authors argue that these approaches – with their emphasis on developing intuition, empathy and self-awareness – can benefit anyone involved in the research enterprise across many disciplines.

re-upload.jpegRosemarie Anderson is a professor emerita at Sofia University. Together with the late William Braud, she created the field we now know as transpersonal research methods. Her individual scholarship includes the creation of an oracular system based on Celtic mythology, a transpersonal research method called intuitive inquiry, an assessment of body awareness called the Body Insight Scale (BIS), an embodied approach to writing and data collection called embodied writing, and a model of human development, which begins at conception and continues through death..

Rosemarie supervises doctoral research and serves as the U.S. representative on the Board of the International Transpersonal Association (transpersonalassociation.org). Throughout the year, she lectures on spiritual and transpersonal topics, including intuition, intuitive inquiry and the creative process.

Before joining Sofia University’s core faculty in 1992, Rosemarie taught in undergraduate and graduate programs at Wake Forest University, Graduate Theological Union, and the University of Maryland’s Asian and European programs. From 1983-87, she served as a university dean for the University of Maryland’s European Division in Germany. In 1987, she was ordained an Episcopal priest and served as a parish priest and university chaplain for several years.

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